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  How quarries work  
 

Crushed rock

Rock quarries usually operate for at least 30 years and are developed in distinct 'benches' or steps. A controlled explosion is normally used to release the rock from the working face. It is then transported by truck or conveyor to a crusher to go through a series of crushing and screening stages to produce a range of final sizes to suit customers' needs.

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Sand and gravel

Sand and gravel quarries are much shallower than rock quarries and are usually worked and restored in progressive phases. This means the area exposed for quarrying at any time can be minimised and land that has been 'borrowed' is out of productive use for a limited period.

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Marine matters

A significant proportion of Britain's need for aggregates is satisfied from the seabed.

At a time when land-based quarrying is under increasing environmental pressure, our vital marine resources are growing in importance as another way to sustain the built environment. What's more, marine aggregates take a front line role in replenishing Britain's beaches and protecting our coastline from erosion.

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Quarries are important rural employers and offer a range of job opportunities
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